Marina Walker Guevara

Guevara 2Marina Walker Guevara is deputy director of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, a global network of reporters who collaborate on cross-borders stories. Her investigations have uncovered environmental degradation by mining companies; exposed illegal fishing syndicates and revealed the true owners behind shell companies in tax havens. She recently co-managed “Offshore Leaks,” an investigation based on 2.5 million secret offshore files, which involved reporters in nearly 60 countries.

linkedInProfileMarina’s stories have appeared in leading international media including The Miami HeraldLe MondeThe Washington Post, El País and the BBC. Her investigations have won and shared more than 20 national and international awards, including from Investigative Reporters and Editors, Overseas Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists and the European Commission.

Marina graduated magna cum laude from Universidad Nacional de Cuyo in Mendoza, Argentina, with a bachelor’s degree in communication sciences, and earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri.

As a candidate for the new board in GIJN, she says:

For the past 10 years my job has been to bring together journalists from all over the world and give them the tools to collaborate on high-impact cross-border investigations. At the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists we believe that there is no better way for journalists to tackle the biggest problems of our time –whether it is the environment or organized crime — than through global reporting teams, skillfully managed and built on trust and the highest journalistic values and principles.

Through the Global Investigative Journalism Network I would like to join other colleagues in spreading the skills, the methods, and the tools that lead to successful collaborations so we can see more high impact, low drama cross-border investigations in the years to come. I am particularly interested in the work we can accomplish in parts of Asia and Africa, where investigative journalists work in incredibly precarious and dangerous conditions. Even though I have lived in the United States for 10 years, I spent most of my life in my home country of Argentina. I understand the unique challenges and needs of Latin American journalists and would like to work through GIJN to support the impressive work my colleagues there are doing and promote new spaces for investigative journalism.